> Temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Mostly Red Rocks, Clouds, Larry N. Young Photography

St. George Utah Temple

Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple

San Antonio Texas Temple

London England Temple

Preston England

Salt Lake Temple and Temple Square

San Diego Utah Temple

Temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Explore Temple Photography

Salt Lake Temple and Temple Square

Salt

Preston England

Preston

Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple

Oquirrh

San Diego Utah Temple

San

St. George Utah Temple

St.

San Antonio Texas Temple

San

London England Temple

London

The following is taken from LDS.org web site.

Temples are not regular places of Sunday worship for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They are quite different from the thousands of regular chapels or meetinghouses all over the world that are used for Sunday services.

Anyone, regardless of religion, may enter a Latter-day Saint meetinghouse and attend services. However, because of the sacredness of temples as “houses of the Lord,” only members of the Church, who are in good standing are allowed to enter the temple.

The sacredness of the temple anciently can be seen in both the Old and New Testaments. In the Old Testament, Moses had the children of Israel carry with them the Tabernacle (a large, portable temple) as they wandered in the wilderness. King Solomon built and dedicated the great temple that was destroyed by the Babylonians in 586 B.C. It was rebuilt and later substantially expanded, but again destroyed by the Romans in A.D. 70. The great Western Wall can still be seen in Jerusalem today, and even after millennia, remains a sacred site for Jews. The New Testament gives an account of Jesus Christ clearing the temples when its sacredness was violated by people using its courts as a common market.

Latter-day Saint temples are considered houses of God, a place of holiness and peace separate from the preoccupations of the world. They provide a place where Church members make formal promises and commitments to God. They are also the place where the highest sacraments of the faith occur — the marriage of couples and the “sealing” of families for eternity.